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Introduction to Python kwargs

In this article, we discuss the kwargs concept in Python. In Python, args is a variable with one star, which passes a variable number of the non-keyworded argument list, whereas kwargs have two stars that pass a variable number of the keyworded argument list to the function. These *args and **kwargs make the function flexible. In Python, we use kwargs, which are keyword arguments used when we provide a name to a variable as we pass it to the function. We use kwargs when we want to handle named arguments with a variable-length argument dictionary in a function.

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Working with kwargs in Python with examples

In this section, when we are unsure how many arguments are needed in the program, we use kwargs with two stars (**) before the parameter name. In Python, when using kwargs, we declare it with two stars (**). Now let us see the demonstration of kwargs in the below example.

Example #1

Code:

print("Program to demonstrate **kwargs for variable number of keywords:") print("n") def concatenate(**kwargs): r = "" for arg in kwargs.values(): r += arg return r print("The concatenated value is displayed as follows:") print(concatenate(a="Educba", b="Training", c="Institue"))

Output:

In the above program, we can see that we have defined a function using the argument variable as kwargs with two stars before it. So when we call this function to concatenate(), which will iterate through the given kwargs dictionary a= “Educba”, b= “Training”, c= “Institue” using “for” loop. Then it prints all these words together, as shown in the output and screenshot above.

Now we will see another use of **kwargs. Let’s see below a function that creates using a dictionary of names.

Example #2

Code:

print("Another use of **kwargs:") print("n") def print_values(**kwargs): for key, value in kwargs.items(): print("The value of {} is {}".format(key, value)) print_values(my_name="Rahul", your_name="Ratan")

Output:

In the above program, we have created a dictionary using **kwargs. As we know dictionary can be unordered; the output might display the name first “Rahul” or with another name, “Ratan” so the dictionary has no order to display the output. This can be seen in the above screenshot.

In Python, the known value within the argument list will remain small whenever the developers or users need a number of inputs without a fix. Let us see below how *args and *kwargs are used. Let us demonstrate below with examples.

Example #3

Below is the program that uses *args to pass the elements to the function in an iterable variable.

Code:

print("Program to demonstrate the *args is as follows:") def func(a, b, c): print(a, b, c) a = [1,2,3] func(*a)

Output:

This program utilizes *args to break the list “a” into three elements. We should also note that the above program works only when the number of parameters of a function is the same as the number of elements in the given iterable variable (here, it is list “a”).

Example #4

Code:

print("Program to demonstrate the **kwargs used in function call is as follows:") def func(a, b, c): print(a, b, c) a = {'a': "one", 'b': "two", 'c': "three" } func(**a)

Output:

In the above program, we are using **kwargs with the name variable as “a” which is a list. Again the above program to work, we need to note that the name of the parameters passed to the function must also have the same name in the dictionary where these act as the keys. And we should also note that the number of arguments should be the same as the number of keys in the dictionary.

In the above section, we observed that args, which employs a single star (), generates the list containing positional arguments defined from the provided function call. Whereas we saw in the above **kwargs, which has a double star (**) which creates a dictionary with keys as each element whose contents can be keyword arguments after those defined from the function call. Hence *args and **kwargs are standard conventions to catch positional and keyword arguments, respectively. We should also note that when we use these two types of arguments in one function, we cannot place or write **kwargs before *args, or we will receive an error.

Conclusion

This article concludes that **kwargs is a keyword argument length list when creating the function with parameters. In this, we saw simple examples of **kwargs. We also saw the use of **kwargs when we were unsure of how many parameters to use we can use kwargs. Then we also saw the difference between *args and **kwargs and how they are used in the function call. In this article, we also saw some important notes to remember, such as we need to pass the same number of arguments with the same number of elements when calling the function. We also saw **kwargs creates a dictionary that displays an unordered element when executed.

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Working Of Scala Random With Examples

Introduction to Scala Random

The Scala Random function generates random numbers or characters in Scala. To generate the Random numbers over Scala, we use the Random process with Scala.util.Random class. The Random number generated can be anything,, be it Integer, Float, Double, or Char. This random no is important for various-level applications such as Validation. So it is used for the Random numbers generation in our Scala Application.

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Syntax:

val r = scala.util.Random r: chúng tôi = [email protected] r.nextInt res1: Int = 1825881164 r.nextInt(100) res2: Int = 99 r.nextFloat res3: Float = 0.10983747 Working of Scala Random with Examples

This function takes up the random function to generate numbers for processing; it generally uses the Linear congruential generator; this algorithm works on choosing the random number. We can also select the range over which we want to generate the number over. We will see the random number generation with some examples.

Example #1

Code:

val r = scala.util.Random r: chúng tôi = [email protected] r.nextInt res0: Int = 2123631858 r.nextInt res1: Int = -737405300 r.nextInt res2: Int = 377538368

Every Time the code is run or this function is called we will get the set of different values in the usual pattern without following any rule or pattern. Even we can also set an inclusive as well as an exclusive limit for the random number we want to generate.

Note: By default, the inclusive limit is 0 so we can also set only the exclusive one.

r.nextInt(100) res3: Int = 64 r.nextInt(100) res4: Int = 91 r.nextInt(100) res5: Int = 39 r.nextInt(100) res6: Int = 38

Output:

Example #2

We can also select the Random Float value by the method chúng tôi the range will lie from 0.0 decimal value to 1. Let us check that with some example:

Code:

r.nextFloat res8: Float = 0.59556204 r.nextFloat res9: Float = 0.8322488 r.nextFloat res10: Float = 0.6295014 r.nextFloat res11: Float = 0.69067985 r.nextFloat res12: Float = 0.7225474 r.nextFloat res13: Float = 0.9606658 r.nextFloat res14: Float = 0.77049905

Same as Float we can also create random numbers for Double Values.

r.nextDouble res18: Double = 0.34614360601266014 r.nextDouble res19: Double = 0.38648718502076507 r.nextDouble res20: Double = 0.31311541536121046 r.nextDouble res21: Double = 0.7410149595118738

It also prints the values between 0 to 1. The Boolean value can also use the same Random value and yields result based on Boolean Values.

r.nextBoolean res15: Boolean = true r.nextBoolean res16: Boolean = false r.nextBoolean res17: Boolean = false

Output:

Example #3

Code:

r.nextPrintableChar res24: Char = K r.nextPrintableChar res25: Char = g r.nextPrintableChar res26: Char = k r.nextPrintableChar res27: Char = K r.nextPrintableChar res28: Char = ' r.nextPrintableChar res29: Char = t

So it prints all the CharatcersRandomly. It is possible that the same character or integer value can come many times; there is no rule for the numbers not to be repeated.

Note: This Random function is widely used for Pattern Verification, security applications like Captcha, and other things.

Output:

Example #4

We can also use the Random function over a distribution. One known function that works with it is the Gaussian function. The Gaussian Function takes the Random data over the Gaussian Distribution and prints data accordingly. It returns a random number with a mean of 0 and a deviation of 1. To change this Gaussian value, we need to provide that explicitly.

Code:

r.nextGaussian res35: Double = 1.301074019733114 r.nextGaussian res36: Double = 0.37365693728172494 r.nextGaussian res37: Double = -0.2868649145689896 r.nextGaussian res38: Double = 2.108673488282321

Output:

This is what it generates randomly over a Gaussian Distribution.

Example #5

We can also merge random functions and create a List or store them in the collection we want. Let us check that with Example:

Code:

for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(4)) yield r.nextDouble res40: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Double] = Vector(0.020069508131527525) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(4)) yield r.nextDouble res41: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Double] = Vector(0.6992494049547558) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextDouble res42: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Double] = Vector(0.9844960499444084, 0.06772285166187964, 0.9797605964534618, 0.6239437080597234, 0.015670036830630618, 0.8530556031658404) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextDouble res43: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Double] = Vector(0.0775137969760199, 0.3150585897780521, 0.5429361580144657, 0.7427799136029297, 0.7595647379710992, 0.6097524030728557, 0.5555829149364843, 0.031480808153179884, 0.9486129909099824, 0.1519146584718376) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextPrintableChar res44: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector(Q, q, n, ", [, r, K, 0, B) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextPrintableChar res45: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector(%, ?) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextPrintableChar res46: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector(m, =) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(3)) yield r.nextPrintableChar res47: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector(6) for(i<- 0 to r.nextInt(10)) yield r.nextPrintableChar res48: scala.collection.immutable.IndexedSeq[Char] = Vector([, =, V, !, Q, f, 9, E)

Here we can see how we merged the different functions of Random and generated results accordingly.

Output:

As a result, this function is used to generate random values throughout the Scala application that may be required repeatedly.

Conclusion

From the above article, we saw how we could use the Scala Random function to generate random values and use it over the Scala Application. We also saw the various type by which we can create a random number. So it is a very good and important method used in Scala Programming for various Scala works.

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Learn The Working And Examples Of Php Queue

Introduction to PHP queue

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The syntax to declare queue in PHP is as follows:

enqueue(item_to_added_to_the_queue); dequeue();

where item_to_be_added_to_the_queue is the item that is going to be added to the queue at the end of the queue or the tail of the queue.

Working of the queue in PHP

Queue in PHP is a data structure that operates based on First In First Out, which is also called FIFO.

Four basic operations define a queue, namely init, enqueue, dequeue, and isEmpty.

init operation is used for the creation of the queue.

enqueue operation is used to add an item at the end of the queue or the tail of the queue.

The dequeue operation is used to remove an item from the front of the queue or the head of the queue.

isEmpty operation is used to check if the queue is empty or not; that is, it returns if the queue contains no more items or not.

Examples of PHP queue

Here are the following examples mention below

Example #1

PHP program to add the items to a queue from the end of the queue using enqueue() function and remove the items from the front of the queue using the dequeue() function, and display the contents of the queue:

Code:

<?php $newqueue = new SplQueue(); } print_r ($newqueue); print_r ($newqueue);

In the above program, we are creating an instance of the SplQueue() class. Then we are adding items to the queue from the tail of the queue or the end of the queue. Then we are making use of the rewind() function to bring the file pointer to the beginning of the queue. Then we are using the valid() function to check if the queue is valid or not after using the rewind() function and then displaying the elements of the queue. Then we are printing the contents of the queue in a human-readable format by using the print_r function. Then we remove the first two items from the head of the queue using the dequeue() function and then display the queue contents after using the dequeuer() function in human-readable form using print_r function. The output is shown in the snapshot above.

Example #2

PHP program to add the items to a queue from the end of the queue using enqueue() function and remove the items from the front of the queue using the dequeue() function, and display the contents of the queue:

<?php $newqueue = new SplQueue(); } print_r ($newqueue); print_r ($newqueue);

Output:

In the above program, we are creating an instance of the SplQueue() class. Then we are adding items to the queue from the tail of the queue or the end of the queue. Then we are making use of the rewind() function to bring the file pointer to the beginning of the queue.

Then we are using the valid() function to check if the queue is valid or not after using the rewind() function and then displaying the elements of the queue. Then we are printing the contents of the queue in a human-readable format by using the print_r function. Then we remove all the three items from the head of the queue using the dequeue() function and then display the queue contents after using the dequeuer() function in human-readable form using print_r function, which is an empty queue. The output is shown in the snapshot above.

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Python ‘If…Else’ In A List Comprehension (Examples)

You can place an if...else statement into a list comprehension in Python.

For example:

["EVEN" if n % 2 == 0 else "ODD" for n in numbers]

Notice that the if...else statement in the above expression is not traditional if...else statement, though. Instead, it’s a ternary conditional operator, also known as the one-line if-else statement in Python.

Example

Given a list of numbers, let’s construct a list of strings that are odd/even based on what the corresponding number in the list of numbers is.

Here’s the code:

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] # Use a list comprehension to create a new list that includes # "EVEN" for even numbers and "ODD" for odd numbers even_or_odd = ["EVEN" if n % 2 == 0 else "ODD" for n in numbers] print(even_or_odd) # Output: ["ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN"]

In this example, the if..else clause in the list comprehension checks to see if the number n is even (that is, if n is divisible by 2 with no remainder). If it is, the string “EVEN” is included in the new list; otherwise, the string “ODD” is included.

The Traditional Approach

Let’s see the traditional for loop with an if...else statement approach for comparison:

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] # Create an empty list to store the results even_or_odd = [] # Use a for loop to iterate over the numbers for n in numbers: # Use an chúng tôi statement to determine if the number is even or odd if n % 2 == 0: even_or_odd.append("EVEN") else: even_or_odd.append("ODD") print(even_or_odd) # Output: ["ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN", "ODD", "EVEN"]

Here’s a fun little illustration of converting the traditional approach to a list comprehension with an if…else statement:

One-Line If-Else Statements in Python

To add an if...else statement into a list comprehension in Python, you need to use a slightly modified version of an if...else statement, called the conditional operator.

The conditional operator in Python allows you to write conditional expressions in a shorter and more concise way. It is also known as the ternary operator because it takes three operands.

Here is the general syntax for using the conditional operator in Python:

x if condition else y

Here, x and y are the values that will be returned based on the evaluation of the condition. If the condition evaluates to True, x will be returned; otherwise, y will be returned.

Here is an example of using the conditional operator to return the maximum of two numbers:

# Define two numbers x = 5 y = 10 # Use the conditional operator to return the maximum of x and y # Print the maximum print(max) # Output: 10

The condition checks to see if x is greater than y. If it is, the value of x is returned; otherwise, it returns y.

The conditional operator can be useful whenever you want to write a conditional expression in a single line of code. It can make your code more readable and concise by avoiding multi-line chúng tôi statements. Also, some argue it only makes the code shorter but less readable which is why some don’t use conditional operators at all.

To include an if...else statement into a list comprehension, you need to pass it as a conditional expression.

Example

Let’s take a look at another example of list comprehensions an if...else statements.

Here is an example of a for loop with an if...else statement that prints whether a number is odd or even in a list of numbers.

First, let’s start with the traditional approach:

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] for number in numbers: if number % 2 == 0: print(number, "is even") else: print(number, "is odd")

Output:

1 is odd 2 is even 3 is odd 4 is even 5 is odd 6 is even 7 is odd 8 is even 9 is odd 10 is even

This for loop can be converted into a one-line list comprehension expression using a conditional operator if...else:

numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10] print([f"{number} is {'even' if number % 2 == 0 else 'odd'}" for number in numbers])

The output of this expression would be the same as the original for loop:

1 is odd 2 is even 3 is odd 4 is even 5 is odd 6 is even 7 is odd 8 is even 9 is odd 10 is even Should You Place If…Else Statements in List Comprehensions?

Whether or not you should use list comprehension expressions with conditional operators in your code depends on your personal preferences and the specific requirements of your project.

Some developers never use one-liner shorthand like list comprehensions or conditional operators.

List comprehensions can be a concise and elegant way to write certain types of for loops, but they can also make your code more difficult to read and understand if you are not familiar with the syntax.

If you are working on a small project with no collaborators, using list comprehension expressions (with if...else statements) can make your code more concise and easier to write.

However, if you are working on a larger project and you are collaborating with other people on a project, it may be more beneficial to use longer and more descriptive for loops that are easier for other people to read and understand.

Ultimately, the decision to use list comprehension in your code should be based on the specific needs of your project, the level of experience and familiarity of the people working on the project, and the trade-off between conciseness and readability.

My personal take: A list comprehension with an if...else statement looks messy and I’d probably not use such expression ever in my code.

Thanks for reading. Happy coding!

Read Also

Python One-Line If…Else Statements

Postgresql In, Not In With Examples

What is PostgreSQL In ?

The IN operator is used in a WHERE clause that allows checking whether a value is present in a list of other values. In Operation helps to reduce the need for multiple OR conditions in SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, or DELETE statements.

In this PostgreSQL Tutorial, you will learn the following:

Syntax

The IN operator takes the following syntax:

value IN (value_1, value_2, ...)

The value is the value that you are checking for in the list.

The value_1, value_2… are the list values.

If the value is found in the list, the operator will return a true.

The list can be a set of numbers of strings or even the output result of a SELECT statement as shown below:

value IN (SELECT value FROM table-name);

The statement placed inside the parenthesis is known as a subquery.

With Character

Let us demonstrate how you can use the IN operator with character values.

Consider the following table:

Employees:

Let us run the following query against the above table:

SELECT * FROM Employees WHERE name IN ('James John', 'Mercy Bush', 'Kate Joel');

It return the following:

We have a list of three names. We are searching for whether we can find any of these names in the name column of the Employees table. The Kate Joel was matched to one of the table’s records, and its details were returned.

With Numeric

Now, let us see how we can use the IN operator with numeric values.

Consider the Price table given below:

Price:

We can run the following query against the table:

SELECT * FROM Price WHERE price IN (200, 308, 250, 550);

This returns the following:

We have created a list with 4 numeric values. We are checking whether we can match any of these values with the values contained in the price column of the Price table. Two values were matched, and their details were returned.

Using NOT operator

The IN operator can be used together with the NOT operator. It returns the values that are not found in the specified column. We will use the Price table to demonstrate this.

SELECT * FROM Price WHERE price NOT IN (200, 400, 190, 230);

This will return the following:

We have created a list with 4 numerical values. We are checking the price column of the Price table for values that are not part of the list. Two values, 250 and 300, were not found. Hence their details have been returned.

Using pgAdmin

Now let’s see how the actions can be performed using pgAdmin.

With Character

To accomplish the same through pgAdmin, do this:

Step 1) Login to your pgAdmin account.

Step 2)

Step 3) Type the query in the query editor:

SELECT * FROM Employees WHERE name IN ('James John', 'Mercy Bush', 'Kate Joel');

It should return the following:

With Numeric

To accomplish the same through pgAdmin, do this:

Step 1) Login to your pgAdmin account.

Step 2)

Step 3) Type the query in the query editor:

SELECT * FROM Price WHERE price IN (200, 308, 250, 550);

It should return the following:

Using NOT operator

To accomplish the same through pgAdmin, do this:

Step 1) Login to your pgAdmin account.

Step 2)

Step 3) Type the query in the query editor:

SELECT * FROM Price WHERE price NOT IN (200, 400, 190, 230);

It should return the following:

Summary:

The IN operator is used with the WHERE operator. It allows checking whether a particular value is present in a specific table.

The IN operator helps in reducing the need for multiple OR operators in SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, or DELETE statements.

When creating a character list to check for the presence of a value, each value in the list should be enclosed within single quotes.

The IN operator can also be used with numeric values.

When the IN operator is used together with the NOT operator, it returns all values that are not found in the specified column.

Download the Database used in this Tutorial

Methods, Constructors Of Java Enummap With Examples

Introduction to Java EnumMap

A Java Collection Framework member known as EnumMap, which extends AbstractMap, is a specific implementation for the interface map, mainly for enumeration types. In addition to that, several other features are also present for EnumMap.

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It includes:

It is not synchronized.

Faster; Compared to this, HashMap is slower.

It is kept in the key’s natural order.

High performance.

Null keys are not allowed. That is, a NullPointerException will be thrown when null keys are present.

Null values can be present.

As keys, enum elements will be used.

More details on Java EnumMap will be discussed in the following sections.

Syntax

Java EnumMap can be declared using the below syntax.

Constructors in Java EnumMap

The following are the constructors that are commonly used in Java EnumMap:

Methods in Java EnumMap

Now, let us see some of the commonly used methods of Java EnumMap.

clear(): Every mapping available in the map will be removed on calling this method.

clone(): A shallow copy will be returned for the enum map mentioned.

containsKey(Objectk): True will be returned if the map has a mapping for the mentioned key k.

containsValue(Objectv): True will be returned if the map maps 1 or more than 1 key to the mentioned value v.

equals(Objectob): Map and the mentioned object ob will be compared for equality.

get(Objectk): Value will be returned if the map has a mapping for the mentioned key k. If there is no value for the key, null will be returned.

hashCode(): Hash code will be returned for the map.

keySet(): A set view will be returned for the keys that are present on the map.

put(Kkey, V value): The value v will be associated with the key K on the map.

remove(Objectk): Mapping will be removed for the key k that is mentioned.

size(): Count of key-value mappings available in the map will be returned.

values(): A collection view will be returned for the values available on the map.

Examples to Implement Java EnumMap

In order to understand more about the Java Enum Map, let us implement the above-mentioned methods in some programs.

Example #1

Sample program to create an enum map and copy the elements to another enum map.

Code:

import java.util.EnumMap; class JavaEnumMapExample { enum fruits { APPLE, ORANGE, GRAPES, KIWI } public static void main(String[] args) { fr.put(fruits.APPLE, 2); fr.put(fruits.ORANGE, 5); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap 1 is :  " + fr); fru.putAll(fr); fru.put(fruits.GRAPES, 3); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap 2 is : " + fru); } }

Explanation to the above program: In the above program, two enum maps are created. The first map is created with 2 elements, and the second map is created by copying the elements of the first map. In addition to that, an extra element is also added to the second map. These are done with the help of put() and putAll() methods.

Example #2

Sample program to create an enum map and get the keys and values separately.

Code:

import java.util.EnumMap; class JavaEnumMapExample { enum fruits { APPLE, ORANGE, GRAPES, KIWI } public static void main(String[] args) { fr.put(fruits.APPLE, 2); fr.put(fruits.ORANGE, 5); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap 1 is :  " + fr); System.out.println("The keys in enum map 1 are : " + fr.keySet()); System.out.println("The values in enum map 1 are : " + fr.values()); fru.putAll(fr); fru.put(fruits.GRAPES, 3); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap 2 is : " + fru); System.out.println("The keys in enum map 2 are : " + fru.keySet()); System.out.println("The values in enum map 2 are : " + fru.values()); } }

Output:

Example #3

Sample program to remove an element from the enum map

Code:

import java.util.EnumMap; class JavaEnumMapExample { enum fruits { APPLE, ORANGE, GRAPES, KIWI } public static void main(String[] args) { fr.put(fruits.APPLE, 2); fr.put(fruits.ORANGE, 5); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap :  " + fr); int val = fr.remove(fruits.APPLE); System.out.println("Removed Value: " + val); System.out.println("The key-value pairs in EnumMap after removing apple :  " + fr); } }

Output:

Explanation to the above program: In this program, an element is removed from the map using the remove() method and the resultant enum map is printed in the next step.

Conclusion

A detailed explanation of all the aspects such as declaration, methods, constructors of Java EnumMap is discussed in this document in detail.

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